Employee diagnostics: What do you care about my personality?

Employee diagnostics: What do you care about my personality? Character traits

How much “humanity” is good for organizations would be answered very differently by people from different philosophies. On the one hand, there are those who say that we can only do good work if we are allowed to be ourselves in a professional context. With the full range of our characteristics, feelings and needs. This view has become very popular with the New Work movement. In his book “Reinventing Organizations”, Frederic Laloux talks about the principle of “wholeness”: we can only do good work if we can be ourselves and don’t have to spend energy on wearing a professional mask.

Many of the things we see in organizations today are based on this way of thinking. The dress code has been abolished in many industries. Employees bring their dogs to work and, especially in young companies, it is no longer a stigma to cry or talk about fears in the work environment.

At the same time, there are many voices (and my perception is that they are becoming increasingly louder) that say it is important to differentiate between people and members of an organization. In this context, the authors of the book “The Humanization of the Organization” speak of a necessary “barrier” between people and companies that protects both sides. As long as the individual character traits and needs of a person do not clash with the manners and behavior associated with a role in the company, they are none of the employer’s business. In this context, the authors speak of “role expectations”.

The bright side of power  

These role expectations raise questions in the face of a fundamentally changing world of work. Examples include the following:

  • Should I still expect my boss to be dominant or even choleric?
  • Should I expect my colleague from the finance department to be fundamentally pessimistic about new ideas?
  • Can I expect an HR colleague to be empathetic and open?

One thing is clear: the values of the next generation and therefore also the expectations of how people work together in companies often differ from those of the baby boomer generation. Whose representatives still hold many important positions in organizations. Especially when it comes to leadership behavior, the ideas diverge.

For a long time, character traits that we would describe as toxic today were beneficial for climbing the corporate ladder. Above-average manifestations of counterproductive behavioral tendencies (self-centeredness, impulsive, strategic manipulation) are still strongly represented among managers today. This is increasingly becoming a problem for companies. Young employees in particular expect their managers not only to set goals and make decisions. But also to motivate, listen and respond empathetically to their needs. According to a LinkedIn study, 41% of employees with up to two years’ work experience would like managers to show more empathy. Among trainees and students, the figure is as high as 60 percent.

More than four colors

However, such soft factors are difficult to read from a CV or documented performance. This is where modern measurement methods based on AI offer new possibilities. AI systems can help HR managers to develop an in-depth understanding of employees’ individual strengths and development potential. Technology makes it possible to take a nuanced look at people and not make hasty judgments. This is important because it should be clear to every HR manager by now that human personality cannot be broken down into four color types. At the same time, the many nuances cannot be captured by an interview or coaching session alone. Especially as all those involved are not free from bias. AI can set new standards here and shine a light on characteristics that have often been overlooked. But are essential for the functioning of an organization.

What does AI measure?

There are different AI models that target different spheres of personality. The goal behind the use of AI systems for HR is basically always the same:

  • ensure that the right people fill the right positions,
  • prevent people with toxic behaviors from taking on management responsibility,
  • check whether the person fits into the corporate culture and,
  • promote the ability of teams to work.

In the area of “Learning & Development”, the focus is on characteristics that are accessible for further development. It is important to emphasize that the aim is not to “turn people around” so that they fit into the organization. This is neither possible nor desirable. Rather, the aim is to use the insights gained with the help of AI to strengthen employees so that they can grow in their professional role. For example, the finance colleague who tends to be overly pessimistic learns to consciously adopt a different perspective. Or the HR colleague learns how to be empathetic. Coaching, mentoring and other formats make this possible.

Outlook

There are different views on how much humanity is good for an organization. Whichever perspective you follow, the key ultimately is whether a person’s behavior and the expectations of the role they perform match. It is less important whether it is authentic behavior or a “professional mask” that employees put on at the office door. What is more important is that their actions are rooted in character traits that consider good and productive cooperation to be desirable for the benefit of the organization and its members.

Behavioral expectations and thus also desirable traits are subject to change. To which companies must respond if they want to attract and retain employees of the new generation. The latest AI models make these character traits, which are essential for the functioning of an organization, measurable and presentable. The technology thus enables both each individual employee and the organization as a whole to develop in the best possible way and shape a desirable future.

You may also like
AI literacy: These are the key skills for modern HR work Image

AI literacy: These are the key skills for modern HR work

The use of AI systems will revolutionize the HR sector. Not using AI is no longer an option. It is now a matter of developing the necessary skills to be able to use the technology in a targeted manner. HR professionals need to start equipping themselves with the knowledge they need to use AI tools effectively while retaining the invaluable human judgment that machines cannot replace.

Everyone wants these five colleagues in 2024 Image

Everyone wants these five colleagues in 2024

From “prompt engineer” to “AI ethicist” to “avatar fashion designer” – new technology is not only eliminating jobs, it is also creating many new fields of activity. This inspired us to think about the hurdles that HR managers in particular are currently facing and what support, new roles or professions there should be in HR to overcome them.

Expensive assessments, even more expensive bad hires Image

Expensive assessments, even more expensive bad hires

According to a study by Glassdoor, companies experience an increase in applications in January, while at the same time employee turnover goes up. For HR, this means juggling between recruiting new talent, conducting appreciative offboarding and keeping the existing workforce happy, often with limited budgets.

AI literacy

These are the key skills for modern HR work
AI literacy

The use of AI systems will revolutionize the HR sector. Not using AI is no longer an option. It is now a matter of developing the necessary skills to be able to use the technology in a targeted manner. HR professionals need to start equipping themselves with the knowledge they need to use AI tools effectively while retaining the invaluable human judgment that machines cannot replace. 

The good news is that HR professionals won’t need to be able to understand complex statistical formulas or code in the future. Rather, it’s about understanding HR metrics and being able to interpret data visualizations, including modern dashboards powered by AI. This fundamental understanding enables HR professionals to gain data-driven insights to solve real-world problems.

What will be better with AI

Research shows that only a small percentage of HR professionals have advanced AI skills. However, those who do use AI and data analytics report positive effects in recruiting, employee engagement and decision-making processes. 

According to a study by Gartner, 76% of HR leaders believe that if their organization does not implement AI solutions in the next 12 to 24 months, it will lag behind those that do in terms of business success.

HR professionals need a basic understanding of how AI works, what the technology can and cannot do. They should focus on what benefits the technology can bring them and what specific use cases there are. In doing so, they should always keep the company’s goals in mind. What can they do better, faster and more cost-effectively with the help of AI in order to achieve these goals?

HR as change management 

The introduction of AI in the HR department inevitably leads to changes in processes and possibly roles. Sometimes it is enough to integrate an AI tool into a workflow and thereby achieve an immediate benefit. Often, however, it is not that simple and a rethink and reengineering of the entire process is required. This shift requires a deep understanding of where human capabilities complement AI and add value to human judgment, data collection and actions.

After all, humans will remain irreplaceable in the future. AI tools have been developed to improve human skills and can be useful in delegating tasks. Technology will be omnipresent in most activities, rather than replacing them entirely. AI systems can often make better, faster and cheaper predictions than humans. However, a prediction is not a decision, it is merely a component. The real value lies in human judgment – the ability to interpret predictions, consider ethical implications and make decisions that machines cannot. HR professionals must address ethical dilemmas, privacy concerns and the need for a continuous learning and adaptation process. 

The better HR managers understand the basic workings of AI systems, the better they will be able to argue in favor of their use. The extended basic understanding includes the following aspects:

  • What model is AI based on? What is represented? What is left out?
  • For what purpose was the AI built?
  • What data was used to train it? 
  • How is the data entered used and stored?
  • Is the AI legally compliant, for example with regard to the European AI Act?
AI Literacy - HR as change management

In the future, another core competence will be not only mastering AI-related changes to tasks and processes, but also communicating them to the workforce, addressing resistance and offering training. 

Data storytelling will become more important at the decision-making level in companies. HR professionals who have mastered it can influence decision-makers by presenting data-driven insights in a convincing narrative, for example to push through additional budgets for recruiting and HR marketing. 

HR remains human

Despite the technical nature of AI, its primary goal in HR is to improve the human work experience and performance. HR professionals should therefore always take a human-centered approach when implementing new tools. At its core, it should be about understanding the needs and behaviors of employees and developing AI solutions that improve their work lives while making the organization as a whole more productive and successful. Skills in methods such as design thinking can be helpful here.

Staying agile

The future of HR work lies in combining the best of AI and human knowledge. Once HR leaders better understand what the technology can do, they can assess the potential use cases and benefits and harness the power of technology to improve their work. At the same time, they can ensure that human judgment remains at the heart of HR decision making. A balance between AI and humans is critical to creating efficient, equitable and human-centered HR practices that can continually adapt to a changing world of work.

✅ AI Literacy at a glance:

  • Operating AI tools
  • Interpreting AI-generated data
  • Integrating findings from data analysis into current HR processes
  • Understanding ethical and legal issues
  • Communicating AI-related changes and benefits
  • Human-centered design thinking
  • Data storytelling

👩‍🎓 Get certified now.

For recruiters, freelance coaches and consultants looking for a comprehensive AI toolkit, Zortify offers a certification program. This opens the door to a world of assessments that measure not only the traditional personality traits, but also the but also the counterproductive behavioral tendencies, and malleable psychological states crucial for professional and personal success.

The next certification dates:

  • March 20-21, 2024, Zurich 
  • April 23-24, Luxembourg
  • May 13-14, Wiesbaden
  • July 16-17, Luxembourg

 

You may also like
Everyone wants these five colleagues in 2024 Image

Everyone wants these five colleagues in 2024

From “prompt engineer” to “AI ethicist” to “avatar fashion designer” – new technology is not only eliminating jobs, it is also creating many new fields of activity. This inspired us to think about the hurdles that HR managers in particular are currently facing and what support, new roles or professions there should be in HR to overcome them.

Expensive assessments, even more expensive bad hires Image

Expensive assessments, even more expensive bad hires

According to a study by Glassdoor, companies experience an increase in applications in January, while at the same time employee turnover goes up. For HR, this means juggling between recruiting new talent, conducting appreciative offboarding and keeping the existing workforce happy, often with limited budgets.

Missed the boat on AI? How companies are catching up Image

Missed the boat on AI? How companies are catching up

Artificial intelligence – we don’t need it. Many companies would probably have signed this sentence a year ago. ChatGPT had been released a few weeks earlier. Today, no company can avoid the question of what it is already using AI systems for.

How AI can save your HR budget

Expensive assessments, even more expensive bad hires
Expensive assessments, even more expensive bad hires

According to a study by Glassdoor, companies experience an increase in applications in January, while at the same time employee turnover goes up. For HR, this means juggling between recruiting new talent, conducting appreciative offboarding and keeping the existing workforce happy, often with limited budgets. If a position is then filled with the wrong person, things can quickly become tight. As most companies probably don’t have an extra “bad hire budget”, they should do everything they can to avoid bad hires. More and more companies are using AI systems to replace expensive and inefficient methods such as assessment and development centers. AI-based employee diagnostics supports HR in doing the best possible job – and sets new standards in personnel development at the same time.

Facts First - Bad Hires

Customized HR work: cheaper than ever before thanks to AI

Understanding and using AI systems costs money at first, of course. But this is money well spent. With the help of artificial intelligence, HR is much more likely to fill open positions with the right people and the investment in onboarding and employee development will pay off in the long term.

How is this possible?

Technological change is making affordable what until recently was expensive: making accurate predictions about who will fit a job and who will not. The more sophisticated the technology becomes, the better HR experts can do their job.

AI systems can already:

    • scan a large number of profiles of potentially interesting talents in social networks,
    • create a pool of suitable candidates for active sourcing,
    • create job descriptions that suitable talents really want to read and in which they can find themselves.

Above all, however, they make assessment and development centers obsolete. These involve an average of five days’ work for several HR managers and often cost tens of thousands of euros. At the same time, the many bad hires and the growing willingness to change jobs in the workforce show that they do not bring the desired outcome. AI systems can change the system. Within minutes, they analyze the information that HR needs to pre-select candidates and reduce the risk of a “bad hire”.

How to avoid the recruiting of toxic coworkers

In order to support the final decision, AI systems can analyze not only the personality profiles of applicants but also their potential fit with regard to their future role in the team. A Harvard study shows just how important this is. According to this study, a top performer with toxic behavioral traits has a worse impact on the overall performance of the company than several employees who only perform at an average level but work well as a team.

Anyone who thinks of the obvious bully when they hear the term “toxic worker” is mistaken. Toxic employees act cleverly and often poison the atmosphere in subtle ways. To avoid this, HR managers need to be able to identify personality traits in advance (i.e. before recruitment) that are not apparent from a CV or assessment center. Using this data, they can identify likely patterns of behaviour and predict how they might affect the performance of the team and the organization as a whole

Quote_Toxic_Coworker - Bad hires

In view of the increasingly complex field of HR tasks and the limits of the human ability to analyze, it was until now impossible to meet this expectation. With the rise of AI systems, this is changing. Data-supported personality analysis will very likely quickly become the new standard in employee recruitment and development and give companies more security in uncertain times.

Minimizing risk with AI

Speaking of uncertainty: in its latest issue, the “brandeins” magazine comes to the conclusion that the slow pace of digitalization in every fourth German company is due to a lack of willingness to take risks. AI can also spark a shift in thinking here: By accelerating processes and securing decisions based on data, companies can act more courageously and flexibly.

These impressive figures are a signal to risk-averse companies to invest in their digitalization even more, as new technologies can significantly reduce risks in important areas of corporate management, such as HR work.

Conclusion

Assuming you don’t have an endless “bad hire budget”, dare to invest in AI. Start low-threshold, for example with SaaS and platform solutions. Because one thing is clear: external risks will not become less in the foreseeable future, but they will be much easier to manage with AI. Companies can use AI-supported risk management and explore new fields with the help of data. The best insurance they have is the right employees who share their goals, values and culture. 

Sources:

Why Wallet Wellness Should Be HR’s Top Priority in 2024 and How Employers Can Stretch Employee Paychecks

Thriving in an age of continuous reinvention

Measure Workforce Resilience for Better Business Outcomes

The real cost of employee turnover and what you can do about it

You may also like
Everyone wants these five colleagues in 2024 Image

Everyone wants these five colleagues in 2024

From “prompt engineer” to “AI ethicist” to “avatar fashion designer” – new technology is not only eliminating jobs, it is also creating many new fields of activity. This inspired us to think about the hurdles that HR managers in particular are currently facing and what support, new roles or professions there should be in HR to overcome them.

Missed the boat on AI? How companies are catching up Image

Missed the boat on AI? How companies are catching up

Artificial intelligence – we don’t need it. Many companies would probably have signed this sentence a year ago. ChatGPT had been released a few weeks earlier. Today, no company can avoid the question of what it is already using AI systems for.

How Companies Get to the Bottom of Quiet Quitting Image

How Companies Get to the Bottom of Quiet Quitting

The topic of “Quitting” is stirring the HR world. People seem to be resigning in very different ways. Sometimes very officially, increasingly internally, often silently. Yet, what does it say about our work environment when people who do what is expected of them (no less, but also no more) are referred to as “Quitters”? – However, we don’t want to become too philosophical here.